Virgin of Guadalupe

Guadalupe2

Virgin of Guadalupe

Did you know that “Guadalupe Day” is regarded by many Mexicans as the most important religious holiday of their country? It honors the Virgin of Guadalupe, the patron saint of Mexico, which is celebrated on December 12. It is believed that a man named Juan Diego encountered the Virgin Mary twice in Mexico City, on December 9 and December 12 in 1531. According to legend, Mary told Juan to ask the bishop to build a church on Tepeyac Hill. However, the bishop needed proof of Juan’s encounter and asked for a miracle. Juan returned to the hill to see roses in a spot where there were previously cacti. When Juan Diego returned, he showed the roses to the archbishop and also revealed an image on his cloak of the Lady of Guadalupe. The bishop was convinced of the miracle and built a church in honor of the event.

With Virgin of Guadalupe Day or Our Lady of Guadalupe Day just around the corner, you can appreciate it in our Folk Art Room. Quinta Mazatlan invites you to explore Folk Art through the eyes of Ann Maddox Moore. The Folk Art Room features over 1,400 pieces of art from Moore’s private collection. Long-time McAllen native, art collector, enthusiast and community supporter, Ann Moore has accumulated Mexican folk art for over 40 years! Her generous gift underscores the cross-cultural nature of the Valley’s relationship with Mexico, and provides a dazzling experience of color and hand work that is fast disappearing. The collection is from all over Mexico, coming from as far away as Oaxaca, Guerrero and Michoacán. There are also other pieces sprinkled in from Africa, Indonesia, Peru, Guatemala and other countries. Moore’s collection creates a bridge to various cultures, traditions and ways of life through folk art.

Quinta Mazatlán is the City of McAllen’s urban sanctuary that continuously works to enrich people’s lives by sharing knowledge about birds, plants, and environmental stewardship in South Texas. The nature center is an oasis of food, water, and shelter, making it a welcome stopover for birds migrating through the Valley in the spring and fall.

Want to learn more about the history of the area and Quinta Mazatlan? History tours are offered every Friday 10am -11am and are included in the General Admission fee: $3 Adults, $2 Seniors (65+) and $2 children under age 12. Free admission to members and children ages 2 years & under. For groups with 10 or more are required to call in advance and schedule a Private Tour.

Private bookings are available. Quinta Mazatlan is located at 600 Sunset Drive in McAllen, TX.

Guadalupe3

Virgin of Guadalupe

Advertisements

Black-tailed jackrabbits

JackRabbit 1(1)

Jack Rabbit with vegetation!

Did you know that Black-tailed jackrabbits are not actually rabbits, but are hares? This is because its young are born with fur and with their eyes already open. The black-tailed jackrabbit most identifying feature is its large ears. The ears along with the tail are tipped with black fur. It has rather long slim front feet and large hind feet that can be 5 inches in length. With large hind legs, jackrabbits can run as fast as 40 mph in short bursts to escape predators. Adult jackrabbits have short lives, between 2-5 years. They can weigh between 3-7 pounds are about 2 feet in length. The large ears of this hare help it to lose heat and thereby cooling its body temperature. They have large eyes that are high on their head and placed toward the side helps them to spot predators. They like open flat places along with desert scrub and mesquite grasslands. The call home south-central Mexico to west-central and western United States. The black-tailed jackrabbit is an herbivore that enjoys feasting on grasses, leaves, clover, alfalfa, twigs, seeds, beans and cacti. But in turn, jackrabbits are an important diet source for many animals. These can include coyotes, hawks, foxes, bobcats and humans. Jackrabbits will often rest in the shade during the heat of the in a shallow depression under grass or bushes. They will forage or rest in groups relying on the eyes and ears of each other for protection.

Want to learn more about Black-Tailed Jackrabbits or other native South Texas animals? Join us for our one-of-a-kind outdoor Sculpture Trail Tour on Thursdays at 10am and develop an appreciation for the vast variety of creatures that call our region home. Each sculpture provides insight into the natural history of the Rio Grande Valley. At each turn of a trail, there’s a new creature to discover. Admission Fee: $3 Adults, $2 Senior Citizens and $2 Children under 12 Free admission to members and children ages 2 years & under. For groups of 10 or more, please call to reserve a private tour. Call us at 956-681-3370 for more information. Come visit us at 600 Sunset Drive in McAllen.

Jasons Obit

“From wealth to nothing but his home, he still was the riches man I ever met.” is an excerpt from Jason Chilton Matthews’ obituary, November 30, 1964. Jason Matthews was a very important and influential man responsible for the construction of Quinta Mazatlan. He and his wife, Marcia, built, lived and created many memories at Quinta Mazatlan for about 30 years. Jason Matthews led an extraordinary life fulfilling his dreams as the owner of the American Mercury, a writer, a composer, and an explorer. One can only imagine the life that Jason Matthews, a true patriot, lived. He led an exciting and adventuress life.

“Armed with the greatest of all weapons, ideas, he stood with courage among the Legions for the Survival of Freedom.” He led where few men fear to tread. He advanced when most retreated. He rallied his to the truth.” Jason left behind cherished memories that never have faded. For as long as there is a memory, he lives on in our heart.

Quinta Mazatlán is the City of McAllen’s urban sanctuary that continuously works to enrich people’s lives by sharing knowledge about birds, plants, and environmental stewardship in South Texas. The nature center is an oasis of food, water, and shelter, making it a welcome stopover for birds migrating through the Valley in the spring and fall.

Want to learn more about the history of the area and Quinta Mazatlan? History tours are offered every Friday 10am -11am and are included in the General Admission fee: $3 Adults, $2 Seniors (65+) and $2 children under age 12. Free admission to members and children ages 2 years & under. For groups with 10 or more are required to call in advance and schedule a Private Tour.

Private bookings are available. Quinta Mazatlan is located at 600 Sunset Drive in McAllen, TX.

Older Mr. Mattews

Jason Matthews left behind cherished memories that never have faded. For as long as there is a memory, he lives on in our heart.

oriole-1

Altamira Oriole leaving its nest

Did you know that The Altamira Oriole is a solitary nester? The average distance between nests is a quarter kilometer (800 ft). The Altamira Orioles (Icterus gularis) are permanent residents within their range – which includes the subtropical lowlands of the Mexican Gulf Coast and northern Central America, the Pacific coast and inland. They can also be found in the Rio Grande Valley.

The Altamira Oriole’s diet consists of small fruits, hackberries and figs. Insects such as grasshoppers, crickets, and caterpillars are also a staple item. They typically forage high up in trees or the undergrowth.

Altamira Orioles are a medium size bird that is 9 -16 inches in length and weighs about 2.1 oz. Both males and females have a black mandible and throat, as well as a black back and long black tail. Wings are black, but the flight feathers are fringed with white. These form a single white wing bar and white wing spots when folded. The secondary coverts form orange epaulets. The underside is almost uniformly orange or yellowish-orange.

Altamira Oriole females lay three to four white eggs heavily marked with brown. The fibrous nest consists of grasses and plant materials, and suspends from a tree branch or utility wire. Incubation ranges from 12 to 14 days and is carried out by the female.

Altamira orioles are seasonally monogamous and may be for life. They are almost always seen in pairs. Their singing is described as being “a loud, musical, but hesitant series of whistles, reminiscent of an inexperienced human whistler.” They seem to prefer the northwest quadrants of trees, as 9 out of 10 nests observed have been built in that part of a tree’s canopy.

Want to learn more about Altamira orioles or other native South Texas animals? Join us for our one-of-a-kind outdoor Sculpture Trail Tour on Thursdays at 10am and develop an appreciation for the vast variety of creatures that call our region home. Each sculpture provides insight into the natural history of the Rio Grande Valley. At each turn of a trail, there’s a new creature to discover.

Admission Fee:

$3 Adults, $2 Senior Citizens and $2 Children under 12

Free admission to members and children ages 2 years & under.

For groups of 10 or more, please call to reserve a private tour.

Call us at 956-681-3370 for more information.

Come visit us at 600 Sunset Drive in McAllen.

Happy Birthday, Mr. Matthews!!

Young Mr. Matthews

Jason Matthews

Born November 20, 1884 in Charlottsville Virginia, Mr. Jason Chilton Matthews was considered a renaissance man for his eccentric ways and world travels. “A world explorer, writer, author and traveler – from the Amazon to the Ganges – he gave people credit from what they are regardless of race, color or creed, without discredit for what they were not or should have been.” exert from Mr. Jason Matthews obituary published in the American Mercury Magazine.

One of his greatest accomplishments was building the largest adobe structure in Texas, Quinta Mazatlan. Armed with a secret adobe block making recipe, true grit and heart, he and his wife Marcia completed the mansion in 1944. Quinta Mazatlan became the headquarters, laboratory and studio for the many endeavors they embarked on.

He was a member of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. He penned “Flame and Melody”, a collection of poems while at Quinta Mazatlan and was credited for composing “Maria”, which was often performed by Fred Waring. Other music classics were, “Moon Over London”, “An Orchid from Hawaii” and “At the Last World’s Fair” to name a few. Mr. Matthews also conducted the Air Force Band out of Moore Air Field Base in McCook.

Owner of the American Mercury, an anti-communist magazine, and founder of “Legions for the Survival of Freedom”, nationalists and populists interested in pro- individual liberty and pro-patriotic, Mr. Matthews patriotism to his country was incomparable to no other. He fought in 11 battles around the globe. His devotion to this country led him to create the ideal nutritional mixture to grow vegetables quickly and efficiently through the use of hydroponics. This concoction was used by our military in the Philippines and Guam after World War II to provide our soldiers abroad healthy and nutritious vegetables.

One can only imagine the life that Mr. Jason Matthews lived. An extraordinary life fulfilling his dreams as an adventurer, author, composer and most of all a true patriot.

Tours have begun and will continue weekly through April 2018. All public tours are included in admission fee: $2 Children under 12, $2 Senior Citizens and $3 Adults. Free admission to members and children ages 2 years & under. Private bookings are available.

For groups with 10 or more are required to call in advance and schedule a Private Tour.

Older Mr. MattewsMatthews with cadet

White-tailed deer

White-Tailed Deer

White-tailed deer standing at alert!

The white-tailed deer can be found in southern Canada and most of the United States. The white-tailed deer is tan or brown in the summer and grayish brown in winter. It has white on its throat, around its eyes and nose, on its stomach and on the underside of its tail. White-tailed deer graze for food at dawn and dusk. A deer’s diet changes depending on its habitat and the season. It eats green plants in the spring and summer. In the fall, it eats corn, acorns and other nuts. In the winter, it eats the buds and twigs of woody plants. White-tailed deer have good eyesight and hearing. Only male deer grow antlers, which are shed and grow back each year. White-tail deer are good swimmers and will use large streams and lakes to escape predators. An adult male deer is called a buck, while an adult female is called a doe and young deer is called a fawn. White-tailed deer are the most popular large game animal in the United States.

Join us for our one-of-a-kind outdoor Sculpture Trail Tour on Thursdays at 10am and develop an appreciation for the vast variety of creatures that call our region home. Each sculpture provides insight into the natural history of the Rio Grande Valley. At each turn of a trail, there’s a new creature to discover.

Admission Fee:

$2 Children under 12, $2 Senior Citizens and $3 Adults

Free admission to members and children ages 2 years & under.

For groups of 10 or more, please call to reserve a private tour.

Call us at 956-681-3370 for more information.

Come visit us at 600 Sunset Drive in McAllen.

IMG_8624

Painted Clay Folk Art!

Quinta Mazatlan invites you to explore Folk Art through the eyes of Ann Maddox Moore. The Folk Art Room features over 1,400 pieces of art from Moore’s private collection. Long-time McAllen native, art collector, enthusiast and community supporter, Ann Moore has accumulated Mexican folk art for over 40 years!

Once humans discovered that clay could be dug up and formed into objects by first mixing with water and then firing, the making of figurines from clay was born. Animal and human figurines were made from clay and other materials, then fired in kilns partially dug into the ground. Through time clay animal figures were cheerfully and whimsically painted. The colorfully painted clay creations represent Mexico’s proud folk art history and each has its own unique character. Animals have always been a favorite subject matter of the folk artists in Mexico. No two pieces are alike and come in a variety of colors with hand painted design embellishments. Some clay artists even step out of the norm and create architectural pieces.

Want to learn more about Quinta Mazatlan? All public tours are included in admission fee: Garden Walk & Talk Wednesdays, 10:00-11:00 am, Forest Sculpture Trail Thursdays, 10:00-11:00 am, History of Quinta Mazatlán Tour Fridays 10:00-11:00 am and Songbird Stroll Saturdays, 8:30-10:00 am.

Admission Fee:

$2 Children under 12, $2 Senior Citizens and $3 Adults

Free admission to members and children ages 4 years & under.

Private bookings available. Come visit us at 600 Sunset Drive in McAllen.

Clay Animals 4

Various